Posts Tagged ‘NFLPA’

how is the nflpa honoring chris henry after his tragic recent death

how is the nflpa honoring chris henry after his tragic recent death

So, the NFLPA’s comment might essentially be an empty public relations statement since Ochocinco is unlikely to be allowed to wear No. 15 this weekend.Should Ochocinco be allowed to wear the jersey?I don’t see why not, but the Bengals are already honoring his memory as a team with helmet decals of No. 15 and lapel pins for the coaching staff.Ochocinco plans to wear Henry’s No. 15By Adam SchefterNFL rules prevent the NFL Players Association from reimbursing Bengals wide receiver Chad Ochocinco for any fines he might incur should he decide to wear Chris Henry’s No. 15 jersey Sunday.NFLPA spokesman George Atallah had tweeted earlier Saturday his organization would cover the fine.The organization has already established a memorial fund for Henry and plan to match any fine for Ochocinco to that fund and/or the Players Assistance Fund.But the NFLPA is prohibited from reimbursing the fine money that would be automatically withheld from Ochocinco’s paycheck by the league.Ochocinco wants to wear Henry’s jersey to honor his former teammate, who passed away Thursday, just as he did during practice last week, but league rules prohibit it.Ochcocinco is familiar with NFL rules. He was prevented from changing the name on his jersey two years ago unless it was his legal name; later Chad Johnson changed his legal name to Chad Ochocinco.

NFL Heads Toward Showdown with Players

NFL Heads Toward Showdown with Players

Despite the relative labor peace and the long, sustained increase in the NFL’s popularity, the owners may be heading on a different tack. In February of this year, it was reported the Owners were considering opting out of the current collective bargaining agreement, which would put the league’s salary cap in jeopardy for the 2010 season due to their belief the arrangement agreed to in March 2006 has created a financially untenable situation for the league. In 1993, the National Football League and its Players Association the NFLPA agreed to terms on a successor collective bargaining agreement that included a salary cap. In the years since, competitive balance in the league has changed such that season to season changes in the success of previously unsuccessful franchises has made for an increase in popularity of the game and league, which has had the effect of increasing revenues. Increased revenues the criteria on which the salary cap is based has led to increased player salaries.

At the time of the March 2006 agreement, the owners and players agreed to an increase in the sharing of qualified league revenues to 60%, ostensibly to maintain the salary cap. Now, it seems the League and some owners are publicly taking the position a salary cap is not absolutely necessary, although it is the preferred approach. The NFLPA, for its part, has said that if the salary cap is allowed to expire, it will never accept another.

While the owners are publicly taking the position that the salary cap may not be that important, the NFLPA has some internal unrest upon which the owners are likely to be seizing.

NFLPA Executive Director Gene Upshaw is scheduled to leave office in 2010 with some apparent movement on his part to influence succession planning and with some internal dissention as to organizational status of some positions within the NFLPA.

Currently the Players Association is looking at the various scenarios which could be at play if/when the owners exercise the option to cancel the collective bargaining agreement: negotiating a successor agreement, strike vs. lock out, and decertification. If the players were to decertify the NFLPA as the exclusive bargaining agent of the players, the NFL could be in violation of anti trust statutes.

The NFLPA has already decertified once in 1989, which led to player anti trust suits and eventually to the 1993 collective bargaining agreement granting free agency rights in return for a salary cap.